Categories
Events

Campus Open Day – 27 June 2022

CYM Events

Campus Open Day

27 June 2022

Come meet the CYM team face-to-face and find out what it’s like to be a CYM student! 

Join us for an interactive Open Day experience at our Nottingham Campus on the morning of Monday 27 June, 10am-12pm.

 

Explore what it’s like to be a student and the BA/MA degree options available for starting your training in September 2022.

  • Meet our senior teaching team. 
  • Experience a live Taster Lecture
  • Hear from CYM students.
  • Explore the options and specialists pathways available at CYM.
  • A chance to ask questions and have a 1-2-1 with tutors.
  • Check out the Campus premises!

All participants are invited to purchase their lunch at the campus cafe and eat with some of our faculty and current students. It’s a great chance to get to know each other more and hang out with the CYM team.

 

Book on today – register here or email [email protected].

Join us at our Nottingham Campus, based at Trent Vineyard Church.

27 June 2022

Find out what it’s like to study with CYM

Locations

Nottingham Campus:

Trent Vineyard Church

Time

10am – 12pm

Optional lunch: 12-1pm

Register

Register here or email [email protected]

to book your place

Nottingham Campus location:

Trent Vineyard Church, Unit 1, Easter Park, Lenton Lane, Nottingham, NG7 2PX

Categories
Events

Campus Open Day – 18 May 2022

CYM Events

Campus Open Day

18 May 2022

Come meet the CYM team face-to-face and find out what it’s like to be a CYM student! 

Join us for an interactive Open Day experience at our Nottingham Campus on the morning of Wednesday 18 May, 10am-12pm.

 

Explore what it’s like to be a student and the BA/MA degree options available for starting your training in September 2022.

  • Meet our senior teaching team. 
  • Experience a live Taster Lecture
  • Hear from CYM students.
  • Explore the options and specialists pathways available at CYM.
  • A chance to ask questions and have a 1-2-1 with tutors.
  • Check out the Campus premises!

All participants are invited to purchase their lunch at the campus cafe and eat with some of our faculty and current students. It’s a great chance to get to know each other more and hang out with the CYM team.

 

Book on today – register here or email [email protected].

Join us at our Nottingham Campus, based at Trent Vineyard Church.

18 May 2022

Find out what it’s like to study with CYM

Locations

Nottingham Campus:

Trent Vineyard Church

Time

10am – 12pm

Optional lunch: 12-1pm

Register

Register here or email [email protected]

to book your place

Nottingham Campus location:

Trent Vineyard Church, Unit 1, Easter Park, Lenton Lane, Nottingham, NG7 2PX

Categories
Events

Campus Open Day – 21 March 2022

CYM Events

Campus Open Day

21 March 2022

Come meet the CYM team face-to-face and find out what it’s like to be a CYM student! 

Join us for an interactive Open Day experience at our Nottingham Campus on the morning of Monday 21 March, 10am-12pm.

 

 

Explore what it’s like to be a student and the BA/MA degree options available for starting your training in September 2022.

  • Meet our senior teaching team. 
  • Experience a live Taster Lecture
  • Hear from CYM students.
  • Explore the options and specialists pathways available at CYM.
  • A chance to ask questions and have a 1-2-1 with tutors.
  • Check out the Campus premises!

All participants are invited to purchase their lunch at the campus cafe and eat with some of our faculty and current students. It’s a great chance to get to know each other more and hang out with the CYM team.

 

 

Book on today – register here or email [email protected].

Join us at our Nottingham Campus, based at Trent Vineyard Church.

21 March 2022

Find out what it’s like to study with CYM

Locations

Nottingham Campus:

Trent Vineyard Church

Time

10am – 12pm

Optional lunch: 12-1pm

Register

Register here or email [email protected]

to book your place

Nottingham Campus location:

Trent Vineyard Church, Unit 1, Easter Park, Lenton Lane, Nottingham, NG7 2PX

Categories
Events

Campus Open Day – 2 February 2022

CYM Events

Campus Open Day

2 February 2022

Come meet the CYM team face-to-face and find out what it’s like to be a CYM student! 

Join us for an interactive Open Day experience at our Nottingham Campus on the morning of Wednesday 2 February, 10am-12pm.

 

Explore what it’s like to be a student and the BA/MA degree options available for starting your training in September 2022.

  • Meet our senior teaching team. 
  • Experience a live Taster Lecture
  • Hear from CYM students.
  • Explore the options and specialists pathways available at CYM.
  • A chance to ask questions and have a 1-2-1 with tutors.
  • Check out the Campus premises!

All participants are invited to purchase their lunch at the campus cafe and eat with some of our faculty and current students. It’s a great chance to get to know each other more and hang out with the CYM team.

 

Book on today – register here or email [email protected].

Join us at our Nottingham Campus, based at Trent Vineyard Church.

2 February 2022

Find out what it’s like to study with CYM

Locations

Nottingham Campus:

Trent Vineyard Church

Time

10am – 12pm

Optional lunch: 12-1pm

Register

Register here or email [email protected]

to book your place

Nottingham Campus location:

Trent Vineyard Church, Unit 1, Easter Park, Lenton Lane, Nottingham, NG7 2PX

Categories
Latest News

CYM announces the appointment of its new CEO: James Archer

CYM Latest News

11th November 2021

Introducing CYM's new CEO: James Archer

The Institute for Children, Youth and Mission (CYM) is poised to equip a new generation of children and youth workers in the wake of the pandemic. 

 

The Institute for Children Youth & Mission (CYM), the specialist theological college for ministry with children and youth and mission in the community, is delighted to announce that James Archer has been appointed as its new CEO. He will oversee CYM’s strategic direction, including partnerships with churches and other organisations across the UK.

 

James brings extensive experience in the field of education and working with young people. As the first Centre Director of the International Montessori Institute at Leeds Beckett University, he led the centre to become a world-leading research centre on early years and Montessori education. He is currently completing a professional doctorate exploring the role of the Montessori method in supporting agency and liberation for children in faith-based settings. He says:

“I am deeply humbled to be invited to take up the role of CEO of CYM and join the experienced and dedicated team that has such a heart for serving the church in the UK. This is a unique time in our nation, and I am looking forward to developing mission-enabling partnerships that support the discipleship of children and young people. CYM is uniquely placed to equip the church through the provision of education and training, and I am excited to see what God will do in this new season.”

CYM’s outgoing Executive Trustee Sarah Fegredo has been appointed Chair of Trustees. She says:

“I’m looking forward to working with James in the coming months as we continue to develop CYM in the coming months. These are exciting times for us and as well as a wealth of experience, James will be bringing new ideas and approaches to our work.”

James Archer
Categories
Blog

Reflective practice can be transformative

CYM Blog

24 June 2021

Reflective practice can be transformative

Reflective practice can be transformative.

 

Why? Because,

 

we see the world not as it is, but as we are.”

Anon

 

Each of us has a perspective, a point of view, an opinion or a story to tell about what has happened in our lives, what is happening now, and what we believe will happen.

 

Our story – as we see it, is the story we tell ourselves – with all of our subjective worries, fears and exaggerations, the things we have missed in our retelling so dont realise where our gaps are. The story that we live is often incomplete, filled with inconsistency and unresolved challenges and issues.

 

Exploring our story – considering our attitudes, feelings, circumstances, what was (and is) beyond our control and what was (and is) within our power to influence. What we chose to do and chose not to do – and how we feel about those choices – can be both joyous and painful. It is so important for our growth as humans. Ultimately, submitting our story to the great author – God himself. What has he already written about us that we are yet to perceive?

 

We have in scripture a blindingly (if you excuse the pun) obvious picture of what transformative reflection might look like. So let’s consider the following through the lens of Pauls journey . . .

Reflect on your story so far. Reflecting on your story is simply taking time to think about it. Perhaps very simply to consider the What”. What has happened?

 

When Paul was blinded by Jesus on the road to Damascus he was plunged in to darkness, became reliant on others to lead him and while in this state had time to reflect on the story he had been living.

 

so they led him by the hand into Damascus. For three days he was blind, and did not eat or drink anything.

Acts 9:8-9

 

Think about that for a moment. Here was this pharisee of the pharisees” leading the charge against this new upstart cult called Christianity, determined to stamp it out, filled with zealous indignation – convinced of the purity and rightness of his cause. Only to be literally blinded by the reality of getting it so wrong. This man who commanded others, took charge and steered the course – suddenly, totally dependent. Incapable of doing anything for himself.

 

Being led by the hand.

 

Sometimes we might struggle to face the reality of needing help from others, we can manage”; weve got this sorted”. What happens to us when our world is shaken and we realise we cannot make a way on our own?

 

A key component of reflective practice is humility. I have so much to learn”, please, you know more about this than I do – can I journey with you for a while and see what I might discover?”

For three days he was blind.

 

Ive a ministry friend who is blind. He engages with the world in a different way to me. He has never seen my face, does not know what I look like – yet he knows me, knows what I am passionate about in ministry – asks good questions and reflects and thinks about the world from a perspective I cannot grasp. For the short time, Paul had to engage with everything in a different way – not just the mind blowing thought that Jesus was alive and was who he claimed to be – but everything.

 

did not eat or drink anything.

 

We arent told if this was Pauls choice or whether he couldnt. My hunch is that he was so blown away that he took that time to fast. In the Old Testament, a fast often accompanied or came after an intense spiritual experience. Another reason for fasting was to repent. The sort of thing you might do if you were waiting for the deliverance of a Messiah – only to realise the Kingdom of God is breaking in, the age to come is NOW and Jesus is that long awaited Messiah.

 

At times your practice of reflection might lead to life shaping discoveries!

 

Reframe your story of now. Reframing happens when you consider your story might not be a true picture of what has taken place – whether that is the events at youth group last week or something that happened a decade ago. Reframing asks some what if questions : What if Im being too hard on myself? What if Ive imagined the way others perceived me in that situation? What if Im being too generous to myself? What if? What IF?

 

The apostle Paul reframes his story (or has his story reframed for him!). This righteous pharisee realises something about himself, as he now sees himself before God.

 

He writes about this in his letter to Timothy with such humility and perception,

 

And the grace of the Lord overflowed to me, along with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus. This is a trustworthy saying worthy of full acceptance : Christ came into the world to save sinners of whom I am the worst. But for this very reason I was shown mercy, so that in me, the worst of sinners, Christ Jesus might display His perfect patience as an example to those who would believe in Him for eternal life.”

1 Timothy 1:14-16

 

Reflective practice needs to be filled with grace. If we believe that God is present, by His Spirit – and that He is active in our lives, then reflection need not hold fear for us – we can move from a place of fear to the freedom Paul found in discovering who He was in the light of who Jesus is.

Have you reframed your story in the light of Gods goodness and grace to you? Have you received His forgiveness for the past? Are you living with the weight of things you have said or done still holding you – or have you been released to live in a new day, with a new now” with Jesus at the centre?

 

Reform your story of what is yet to come. This is about hope. Beyond the here and now, beyond what has gone before – looking to a future that while yet to happen, we can enter – moment by moment – with confidence. Paul calls us to join Him on this quest. These three passages help me consider this in my own story,

 

Though I am free of obligation to anyone, I make myself a slave to everyone, to win as many as possible. to the Jews I became like a Jew, to win the Jews. To those under the law I became like one under the law (though I myself am not under the law), to win those under the law. To those without the law (thought I am not outside the law of God but am under the law of Christ), to win those without the law. To the weak I became weak, to win the weak. I have become all things to all men, so that by all possible means I might save some.”

1 Corinthians 9:19-21

 

This passage is often used in the context of relational evangelism – we meet people where they are at. Yet, this passage also shows us the journey Paul has been on. Look at what has happened to him.

 

From Pharisee – from badge of honour among his peers, from that recognition and value in the community he grew up in – to, well – whatever works for spreading the gospel. Paul is clothed in Christ” (Galatians 3:27) – no other attire is needed now. The freedom and security this brings!

Can we jettison what will others think?” as we make changes? Can we find ourselves by finding ourselves” in Christ – and that being enough for us? What are the trappings of our ministry or life or habits or public profiles on social media that need to re-examined in the light of the character that Christ is forming in us?

 

follow me as I follow Christ.”

1 Corinthians 11:1

 

What Paul is talking about with who he becomes” is no more than what Jesus did. In fact Jesus became fully human, taking on our form – God incarnate – “giving up” all that he had every right to in Heaven. Paul writes about that too in Philippians Chapter 2 . . . and in his life and ministry Paul seeks to follow – literally – to copy Christ”. The word used is the root word for the word mimic

 

As we reflect on who we are becoming – who is it we look to, follow, aspire to be like, are mentored by – how do they reflect Christ? Paul here isnt just talking about what He is doing – but what we should do. Have you ever reflected on who is following you?

 

When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I set aside childish ways. Now we see but a dim reflection as in a mirror, then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part : then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.”

1 Corinthians 13:11-12

 

There remains an unclear picture – despite his transformative encounter with Jesus on the road to Damascus – Paul recognises the limits of what can be known in this life. He knows that one day” all will become clear.

 

Reflective practice acknowledges that tension – we discover new things, we find out our story – our lives need re-framing” with this new understanding – yet we know this journey repeats. We do not arrive – yet continue to grow, discover, become more fully the people that God has called us to be through Jesus.

The story of my future is reformed with hope. I dont know what the future holds, but I know who holds the future – is a cliche, but is also true.

 

Why not ::

Reflect on your past. What has happened, where have you come from to get to this place?

Reframe your now. What have you discovered that might lead to change? What can you change? What do you need to accept? Where can you see the finger-print of God in your life? Can you embrace his forgiveness, grace and love?

Reform your future. The future isnt set – you can step in to what God has for you. If your now can be reframed as you let go of the past, how does that change your future? How different does your tomorrow look if what has been does not have to be what will be? Yes, we see through a glass dimly – but also, most wonderfully, this :

 

Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. and we, who with unveiled faces all reflect the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into His image with intensifying glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit.

1 Corinthians 3:17-18

ALI CAMPBELL

CYM Trustee & Alumni (Masters in Reflective Practice and Applied Theology)

Youth and Children’s Ministry Consultant

Above: Ali Campbell, CYM Trustee and Alumni

Categories
Latest News

A Fond Farewell to the Class of 2021

CYM Latest News

24 June 2021

A Fond Farewell to the Class of 2021

To the Class of 2021, we wish you all the very best on the next part of your journeys. This goodbye message comes with prayers and blessings from all the trustees and staff at CYM. 

 

 

As you depart, we would love to invite you to be part of our CYM ALUMNI NETWORK. Sign up here to stay in touch. 

 

With blessings,

The Trustees and Faculty at CYM

Categories
Blog

Introducing Ali Campbell …

CYM Blog

7 June 2021

Introducing Ali Campbell ...

Ali Campbell, Youth & Children’s ministry consultant and CYM Alumni, is the latest addition to the CYM Board of Trustees. Read more about Ali here …

My name is Ali Campbell and I’ve been involved in children’s and youth ministry for 35 years (so far!). My journey with CYM began back in the early 2000s when, as the then Youth Minister at a church in West London, I became line manager of a CYM degree student! Not long after I was asked to be a field work tutor for a group of students. More recently I’ve been a tutor / trainer on the “Engage” Children’s Ministry course and also completed my Masters with CYM back in 2011!

 

Somehow, whichever way I have turned in ministry, there has been CYM – like some friendly shadow. Having watched the children’s and youth ministry landscape shift and change and then convulse over the last 18 months due to Covid, it has been reassuring to see CYM continuing to offer a great learning experience for all – whether the interest is in professional development days for time poor full timers or undergraduate courses with pathways that enable practitioners to specialise in their chosen filed.

 

I can’t tell you how much I have valued the chance to learn from and be challenged and encouraged by all those I have come in to contact with at CYM over the years – from fellow MA students who I am still in touch with, to some of the legends of the children’s and youth ministry world who have been involved in enabling CYM to still be here in 2021 – seeking to be an inspiring and prophetic voice in the world of training and professional development.

 

I was therefore delighted to be asked to be a trustee. I hope I can bring enthusiasm for the disciplines of children’s, youth and family ministry, creativity and passion for all we are doing and a willingness to get stuck in where I might be of most use as CYM look to begin another academic year.

ALI CAMPBELL

CYM Trustee & Alumni

Youth and Children’s Ministry Consultant

Above: Ali Campbell, CYM Trustee and Alumni

Categories
Blog

The role of the ‘professional’ in CYF ministry

CYM Blog

25 May 2021

The role of the 'professional' in CYF ministry

What does it mean to be a ‘professional’? Should those engaged in, or exploring a call to ministry seek such a label? Does it matter? 

 

These are all big and important questions to wrestle with. 

 

Historically, the notion of ‘profession’ was attached to three spheres of work: medicine, law, and, you’ve guessed it, ministry, or more specifically, the priesthood. Over time, as societies, work and economies have shifted, notions of ‘profession’ have (often helpfully) diversified. You can look at most job adverts nowadays and the requirements and language will indicate, or at least infer, the need to be ‘professional’. 

 

Of course, notions of ‘professionalism’ are contested. Traditionally, at least, being professional sits between regulation and autonomy – in one sense, those occupations which claim some form of professional status, tend to be regulated by bodies that are often governmentally approved or, in some instances, directed. Ostensibly, this is in order that they enjoy public trust to practice ‘autonomously’. For some of us, who are interested in working in different types of ‘people ministry, forms of control like this might feel more than a little challenging especially as this type of work has traditionally been thought of as being under the banner of ‘civil society’ – a buffer zone between people and the state.  

 

And there is another issue. If everything and everyone is called in their work to ‘be professional’, has the term become a catch-all devoid of any real meaning? For some thinkers in this field, ‘project professionalisation’ has become a means by which capitalist states, and other organisations (subtly) control their workforces through bureaucratic regulation, marketisation and possibly even pay cuts. This is especially the case in respect of the ‘people professions’ in which many people are motivated by a deep sense of vocation. In this view, ‘professionalisation’ might be seen as the very opposite – ‘deprofessionalisation’ – wherein work is devalued, and where there is control, but without real autonomy.  So, perhaps those of us engaged in ministry should reject notions of ‘profession’ and see through them for what they are – clinical, controlling and ‘of the world’.

 

Maybe, but I would suggest another option – the need to ‘name’, reject, be playful with’ but ultimately redeem the best aspects of what it means to be professional. This may help us reorientate our thinking towards new possibilities – to consider again who it is we seek to serve and what it is in terms of kingdom, society and justice that we join God in building. Colossians 3v23 comes to mind: ‘Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters’. This, I think, calls us to ‘do all things well’ and to continually engage in honest, shared dialogue and reflection regarding what this means in developing ministerial praxis.

 

It’s this connection that brings me to something that was suggested recently during exploration of these themes with CYM students – that we might explore what it means for us to be ‘God’s professionals’ – a space where we are empowered and given autonomy by the Holy Spirit to be who God has called us to be in the context of communities and people’s lives. To be Christ to people and to do so ethically in ways that enjoy freedom and accountability. 

 

Yet we need to also recognise that the complexities of practice mean that we don’t minister in isolated bubbles – we are often called to work and minister in situations that are complicated and involve multiple stakeholders including other professionals. This reminds me of the story of one of my PhD interviewees who had been a Christian youth worker for many years before studying for a degree. ‘Steve’ said that completing his degree helped him gain credibility in representing the church in his work alongside a range of professionals including police officers, social workers and NHS and Youth Offending Team staff. For me, that’s significant in being one of ‘God’s professionals’ – in being the best we can be in serving others and God’s kingdom.  

 

Why not have a chat with us if you’re exploring that call? 

GRAHAM BRIGHT

Senior Lecturer and Practice Co-ordinator – CYM

Above: Graham Bright, Senior Lecturer at CYM, shares his thoughts on what it means to be a ‘professional’ in the realm of CYF ministry.

Categories
Latest News

New dawn for CYM as it relaunches as an independent college for children, youth and community ministry

CYM Latest News

12th May 2021

New Dawn for CYM as it relaunches as an independent college for children, youth and community ministry

The Institute for Children, Youth and Mission (CYM) is poised to equip a new generation of children and youth workers in the wake of the pandemic. 

 

The Institute for Children, Youth and Mission – CYM – is relaunching as an independent college focused on supporting ministry and mission for children, young people and families. Having previously had a multiple ‘centre’ approach to teaching, from September 2021 CYM will be operating out of one dedicated, centralised teaching function.  

 

The specialist BA and MA degrees are now accredited by Newman University. The focus of CYM’s practice-based training is two-fold: to equip people to work in churches and Christian voluntary sector organisations, and also to prepare people to work in the wider statutory and voluntary sector in related fields.

 

By offering specialist degrees and short course training, CYM is able to support churches, charities, and chaplaincies to train children, youth and family workers, and volunteers to serve across diverse settings.

 

Sarah Fegredo, Executive Trustee of CYM comments: “CYM’s aim is to support the church in the pivotal moment we are in both through coronavirus but also through the need to inspire new communities and generations.  There is no doubt that the pandemic has taken a huge toll on families across the nation and as the church looks to meet the needs of people in their community, connecting with children, young people and their carers is a growing priority.

 

“We are already seeing many communities and churches rethinking their mission to ‘the lost generation’ (0-30 age group) and investing in learning and development in this area. Equipping a new generation of workers in this field will undoubtedly have a positive impact and CYM is ready to offer this support with our specialist training programmes.”

 

Like many academic institutions who have had to adapt their models since the pandemic hit, CYM has seen new opportunities for offering a wider training portfolio alongside their specialist degrees.

 

Sarah continues: “Our degree courses have been around for 20 years and are well known for offering the mixed teaching and practical approach that many workers in the field look for. We are hitting the refresh button on these courses now and have established a new teaching centre in Nottingham. This central location in the Midlands, creates an accessible location for when face-to-face teaching resumes; in the meantime our students are effectively accessing learning and pastoral support remotely.  Alongside that we are now offering a portfolio of new CPD short courses that are ideal for anyone exploring new ministry areas, wanting to boost their confidence or refresh their knowledge.”

 

Applications are now open for CYM’s BA and MA degree courses starting September 2021. If you want to be part of a movement to equip more children and youth workers ready to serve in diverse settings across society, find out about more about CYM training at cym.ac.uk.